Tag Archives for " Financial Statements "

ASU 2016-14
Feb 12

Understanding the New Nonprofit Accounting Standard

By Charles Hall | Accounting

Are you ready to implement FASB’s new nonprofit accounting standard? Back in August 2016, FASB issued ASU 2016-14, Presentation of Financial Statements of Not-for-Profit Entities. In this article, I provide an overview of the standard and implementation tips.

new nonprofit accounting

New Nonprofit Accounting – Some Key Impacts

What are a few key impacts of the new standard?

  • Classes of net assets
  • Net assets released from “with donor restrictions”
  • Presentation of expenses
  • Intermediate measure of operations
  • Liquidity and availability of resources
  • Cash flow statement presentation

Classes of Net Assets

Presently nonprofits use three net asset classifications:

  1. Unrestricted
  2. Temporarily restricted
  3. Permanently restricted

The new standard replaces the three classes with two:

  1. Net assets with donor restrictions
  2. Net assets without donor restrictions

Terms Defined

These terms are defined as follows:

Net assets with donor restrictions – The part of net assets of a not-for-profit entity that is subject to donor-imposed restrictions (donors include other types of contributors, including makers of certain grants).

Net assets without donor restrictions – The part of net assets of a not-for-profit entity that is not subject to donor-imposed restrictions (donors include other types of contributors, including makers of certain grants).

Presentation and Disclosure

The totals of the two net asset classifications must be presented in the statement of financial position, and the amount of the change in the two classes must be displayed in the statement of activities (along with the change in total net assets). Nonprofits will continue to provide information about the nature and amounts of donor restrictions.

Additionally, the two net asset classes can be further disaggregated. For example, donor-restricted net assets can be broken down into (1) the amount maintained in perpetuity and (2) the amount expected to be spent over time or for a particular purpose.

Net assets without donor restrictions that are designated by the board for a specific use should be disclosed either on the face of the financial statements or in a footnote disclosure.

Sample Presentation of Net Assets

Here’s a sample presentation:

Net Assets
Without donor restrictions
  Undesignated  $XX
  Designated by Board for endowment      XX
     XX
With donor restrictions
  Perpetual in nature      XX
  Purchase of equipment XX
  Time-restricted XX
XX
Total Net Assets $XX

Net Assets Released from “With Donor Restrictions”

The nonprofit should disaggregate the net assets released from restrictions:

  • program restrictions satisfaction
  • time restrictions satisfaction
  • satisfaction of equipment acquisition restrictions
  • appropriation of donor endowment and subsequent satisfaction of any related donor restrictions
  • satisfaction of board-imposed restriction to fund pension liability

Here’s an example from ASU 2016-14:

nonprofit statement of activities

Presentation of Expenses

Presently, nonprofits must present expenses by function. So, nonprofits must present the following (either on the face of the statements or in the notes):

  • Program expenses
  • Supporting expenses

The new standard requires the presentation of expenses by function and nature (for all nonprofits). Nonprofits must also provide the analysis of these expenses in one location. Potential locations include:

  • Face of the statement of activities
  • A separate statement (preceding the notes; not as a supplementary schedule)
  • Notes to the financial statements

I plan to add a separate statement (like the format below) titled Statement of Functional Expenses. (Nonprofits should consider whether their accounting system can generate expenses by function and by nature. Making this determination now could save you plenty of headaches at the end of the year.)

External and direct internal investment expenses are netted with investment income and should not be included in the expense analysis. Disclosure of the netted expenses is no longer required.

Example of Expense Analysis

Here’s an example of the analysis, reflecting each natural expense classification as a separate row and each functional expense classification as a separate column.

expenses by function and nature

The nonprofit should also disclose how costs are allocated to the functions. For example:

Certain expenses are attributable to more than one program or supporting function. Depreciation is allocated based on a square-footage basis. Salaries, benefits, professional services, office expenses, information technology and insurance, are allocated based on estimates of time and effort.

Intermediate Measure of Operations

If the nonprofit provides a measure of operations on the face of the financial statements and the use of the term “operations” is not apparent, disclose the nature of the reported measure of operations or the items excluded from operations. For example:

Measure of Operations

Learning Disability’s operating revenue in excess of operating expenses includes all operating revenues and expenses that are an integral part of its programs and supporting activities and the assets released from donor restrictions to support operating expenditures. The measure of operations excludes net investment return in excess of amounts made available for operations.

Alternatively, provide the measure of operations on the face of the financial statements by including lines such as operating revenues and operating expenses in the statement of activities. Then the excess of revenues over expenses could be presented as the measure of operations.

Liquidity and Availability of Resources

FASB is shining the light on the nonprofit’s liquidity. Does the nonprofit have sufficient cash to meet its upcoming responsibilities?

Nonprofits should include disclosures regarding the liquidity and availability of resources. The purpose of the disclosures is to communicate whether the organization’s liquid available resources are sufficient to meet the cash needs for general expenditures for one year beyond the balance sheet date. The disclosure should be qualitative (providing information about how the nonprofit manages its liquid resources) and quantitative (communicating the availability of resources to meet the cash needs).

Sample Liquidity and Availability Disclosure

The FASB Codification provides the following example disclosure in 958-210-55-7:

NFP A has $395,000 of financial assets available within 1 year of the balance sheet date to meet cash needs for general expenditure consisting of cash of $75,000, contributions receivable of $20,000, and short-term investments of $300,000. None of the financial assets are subject to donor or other contractual restrictions that make them unavailable for general expenditure within one year of the balance sheet date. The contributions receivable are subject to implied time restrictions but are expected to be collected within one year.

NFP A has a goal to maintain financial assets, which consist of cash and short-term investments, on hand to meet 60 days of normal operating expenses, which are, on average, approximately $275,000. NFP A has a policy to structure its financial assets to be available as its general expenditures, liabilities, and other obligations come due. In addition, as part of its liquidity management, NFP A invests cash in excess of daily requirements in various short-term investments, including certificate of deposits and short-term treasury instruments. As more fully described in Note XX, NFP A also has committed lines of credit in the amount of $20,000, which it could draw upon in the event of an unanticipated liquidity need.

Alternatively, the nonprofit could present tables (see 958-210-55-8) to communicate the resources available to meet cash needs for general expenditures within one year of the balance sheet date.

Cash Flow Statement Presentation

A nonprofit can use the direct or indirect method to present its cash flow information. The reconciliation of changes in net assets to cash provided by (used in) operating activities is not required if the direct method is used.

Consider whether you want to incorporate additional changes that will be required by ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows–Restricted Cash. If your nonprofit has no restricted cash, then this standard is not applicable.

You can early implement ASU 2016-18. (The effective date is for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018.) Once this standard is effective, you’ll include restricted cash in your definition of cash. The last line of the cash flow statement might read as follows: Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash.

Effective Date of ASU 2016-14

The effective date for 2016-14, Not-for-Profit Entities, is for fiscal periods beginning after December 15, 2017 (2018 calendar year-ends and 2019 fiscal year-ends). The standard can be early adopted.

For comparative statements, apply the standard retrospectively. 

If presenting comparative financial statements, the standard does allow the nonprofit to omit the following information for any periods presented before the period of adoption:

  • Analysis of expenses by both natural classification and functional classification (the separate presentation of expenses by functional classification and expenses by natural classification is still required). Nonprofits that previously were required to present a statement of functional expenses do not have the option to omit this analysis; however, they may present the comparative period information in any of the formats permitted in ASU 2014-16, consistent with the presentation in the period of adoption.
  • Disclosures related to liquidity and availability of resources.
Review Financial Statements
Apr 18

How to Review Financial Statements Efficiently and Effectively

By Charles Hall | Accounting and Auditing

Most CPA firms create financial statements for their clients. This blog post tells you how to create and review financial statements efficiently and effectively.

Review Financial Statements

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How to Create Financial Statements

First, staff members create the original financial statements. Where possible, electronically link the trial balance to the financial statements. Doing so will expedite the financial statement process and enhance the integrity of the numbers. Ask the staff member to do the following:

  • Prepare the initial draft of the statements
  • Create clear disclosures
  • Complete a current financial statement disclosure checklist 
  • Research any nonstandard opinion or report language (place sample reports from PPC or other sources in the file) — later the partner will compare this supporting document to the opinion or report
  • Research any additional reports (e.g., Yellow Book, Single Audit); place copy of such reports in the file — the partner or manager will have such reports available for their review
  • The staff person should review the partner’s planning document to see if any new standards are to be incorporated into this to year’s financial statements

How to Proof the Financial Statements

Second, proof your financial statements. The proofer usually does the following before the partner or managers’ review:

  • Add (foot the numbers for) all statements, notes, schedules
  • Tick and tie numbers such as:
    • Total assets equal total liabilities and equity
    • Ending cash on the cash flow statement agrees with the balance sheet
    • Net income on the income statement agrees with the beginning number of an indirect method cash flow statement
    • Numbers in the notes agree with the financial statements
    • Numbers in the supplementary schedules agree with the financial statements
  • Review financial statements for compliance with firm formatting standard 
  • Read financial statements for appropriate grammar and punctuation (consider using Grammarly)
  • Compare the table of contents to all pages in the report
  • Review page numbers

Partner or Manager Review

Finally, the partner or manager reviews the financial statements. Having the proofer do their part will minimize the review time for this final-stage review.

Here are tips for the final review:

  • Scan the complete set of financials to get a general feel for the composition of the report (e.g., Yellow Book report, supplementary information, the industry, etc.) — this is a cursory review taking three or four seconds per page
  • Read the beginning part of the summary of significant accounting policies taking note of the reporting framework (e.g., GAAP), type of entity (e.g., nonprofit), and whether the statements are consolidated or combined — doing so early provides context for the remaining review of the financials
  • Read the opinion or report noting any nonstandard language (e.g., going concern paragraph)
    • Agree named financial statement titles in the opinion or report to the financial statements
    • Agree the dates (e.g., year-end) in the opinion or report and compare to the statements
    • Compare supporting sample report (as provided by your staff member and noted above) to the opinion or report
    • Compare representation letter date to the opinion or review report date
  • Review the balance sheet making mental notes of line items that should have related notes (retain those thoughts for review of the notes)
  • Review the income statement
  • Review the statement of changes in equity (if applicable)
  • Review the cash flow statement
  • Review the notes (making mental notes regarding sensitive or important disclosures so you can later see if the communication with those charged with governance appropriately contains references to these notes)
  • Return to the balance sheet to see if there are additional disclosures needed (since you just read the notes, you will be more aware of omissions — e.g., intangibles are not disclosed)
  • Review supplementary information (and related opinion for this information if applicable)
  • Review other reports such as Yellow Book and Single Audit (the staff member preparing the financial statements should have placed supporting examples in the file; refer to the examples as necessary)
  • If the review is performed with a printed copy of the statements, use yellow highlighter to mark reviewed sections and numbers
  • If the review is done on paper, pencil in corrections and provide corrected pages to the staff member for amendments to be made
  • If the review is performed on the computer, take screenshots of pages needing corrections and provide to the staff member
  • Alternatively, make corrections using Track Changes if the financial statements are in a Word document; these changes will appear in a different color so you can visually see what was changed; Word also provides a different color for each person who makes a change, so you can see who changed what

Last Step

Destroy all drafts–or at a minimum, don’t leave them in the file. Once the financial statements are complete, there is no reason to retain drafts.

Your Suggestions

What other review procedures do you use?

report debt covenant violation
Apr 12

How to Report Debt Covenant Violations

By Charles Hall | Accounting

How does a debt covenant violation affect the presentation of debt on a balance sheet? In this article, I will tell you how to report debt covenant violations.

If a debt covenant violation occurs, the debt should be classified as current unless the lender provides a waiver for at least one year from the balance sheet date or the debtor is able to cure the violation subsequent to the balance sheet date but before the issuance date (or date available for issuance) of the financial statements.

Some loans provide for a grace period. If the violation is cured during the grace period, the debt–other than current maturities–will be reported as as long-term. Also if the cure has not already occurred but the company demonstrates it is probable that it (the cure) will occur within the grace period, then, again, the debt will be reported as long-term.

report debt covenant violations

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Report Debt Covenant Violation

The main consideration in classifying long-term debt is whether the amount is due or callable within one year of the balance sheet date. (By definition, a liability is current when due within one year of the balance sheet date.) If due or callable within the year subsequent to the period-end, the amount generally should be reported as current. (One exception: when it is probable the cure will occur within the grace period.) If a debt covenant violation is timely cured, then the debt is no longer callable and will, therefore, remain long-term. The same is true if the creditor provides a waiver that extends one year beyond the balance sheet date.

Note–Even minor violations of debt agreements may allow the creditor to call a loan.

FASB Codification Guidance

470-10-45 of the FASB Codification provides the following guidance:

Some long-term loans require compliance with quarterly or semiannual covenants that must be met on a quarterly or semiannual basis. If a covenant violation occurs that would otherwise give the lender the right to call the debt, a lender may waive its call right arising from the current violation for a period greater than one year while retaining future covenant requirements. Unless facts and circumstances indicate otherwise, the borrower shall classify the obligation as noncurrent, unless both of the following conditions exist:

a. A covenant violation that gives the lender the right to call the debt has occurred at the balance sheet date or would have occurred absent a loan modification.
b. It is probable that the borrower will not be able to cure the default (comply with the covenant) at measurement dates that are within the next 12 months.

Is Disclosure Required if a Waiver is Obtained?

If the company obtains a waiver for one year from the balance sheet date, must the financials disclose this fact (that a waiver was obtained)?

The AICPA answers this question–in Q&A section 3200 (paragraph 17)–with the following:

The authoritative literature applicable to nonpublic entities does not address disclosure of debt covenant violations existing at the balance-sheet date that have been waived by the creditor for a stated period of time. Nevertheless, disclosure of the existing violation(s) and the waiver period should be considered* for reasons of adequate disclosure. If the covenant violation resulted from nonpayment of principal or interest on the debt, inability to maintain required financial ratios, or other such financial covenants, that information may be vital to users of the financial statements even though the debt is not callable.

*Emphasis added by CPA-Scribo

Translation: It is wise to disclose the debt covenant violation and the existence of the waiver.

FASB’s Current Work on a New Standard

On January 10, 2017, the FASB issued the Exposure Draft, Debt (Topic 470): Simplifying the Classification of Debt in a Classified Balance Sheet (Current versus Noncurrent). Click here for more information.

Additional Information About Auditing Debt

See my post about how to audit debt here.

Pro Forma Information
Oct 17

Are You Up to Speed on the New Pro Forma Information Standard?

By Charles Hall | SSARS

The Accounting and Review Services Committee (ARSC) issued SSARS 22 Compilation of Pro Forma Financial Information. You may remember that ARSC did not address pro forma information in SSARS 21. SSARS 22 clarifies AR 120 Compilation of Pro Forma Information and codifies it as AR-C 120.

Pro Forma Information

So what is pro forma information? It is a presentation that shows what the significant effects on historical financial information might have been had a consummated or proposed transaction (or event) occurred at an earlier date.

Pro Forma Information

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To understand SSARS 22, let’s answer a few questions.

Examples of Pro Forma Information

Examples of pro forma information include presenting financial statements for the following:

  • Business combinations
  • The selling of a significant part of a business
  • A change in the capitalization of an entity

Again we are providing financial information as though the transaction or event has–already–occurred.

Required Disclosures

In pro forma financial information, what should be disclosed?

  • A description of the transaction (or event) that is reflected in the presentation
  • The date on which the transaction (or event) is assumed to occur
  • The financial reporting framework
  • The source of the financial information
  • The significant assumptions used
  • Any significant uncertainties about those assumptions
  • A statement that the pro forma information should be read in conjunction with the related historical information and that the pro forma information is not necessarily indicative of the results that would have been attained had the transaction (or event) actually taken place

Independence

Must the accountant consider his or her independence? Yes, since this is a compilation engagement. (Note: The preparation of the pro forma information is considered a nonattest service.)

Acceptance and Continuance

Should the accountant perform acceptance and continuance procedures? Yes.

Engagement Letter

Is an engagement letter required? Yes, and it must be signed by the accountant’s firm and management or those charged with governance.

Compilation Procedures

What compilation procedures should be performed?

  • Read the pro forma financial information to determine if it is appropriate in form and free from obvious material misstatement
  • Obtain an understanding of the underlying transaction or event (that the pro forma information is based upon)
  • Determine that management includes:
    • Complete financial statements for the most recent year (or from the preceding year if financial statements for the most recent year are not yet available) or make such financial statements readily available (e.g., post on a public website)
    • If pro forma financial information is presented for an interim period, either historical interim financial information for that period (which may be in condensed form) or make such interim information readily available
    • For business combinations, the relevant financial information for the significant parts of the combined entity
  • Determine that the information in the preceding bullet has been subjected to a compilation, review or an audit
  • Determine that the compilation, review or audit report on the historical information is included in any document containing the  pro forma financial information (or made readily available such as on a public website)
  • Determine whether the significant assumptions and uncertainties are disclosed
  • Determine whether the source of the historical financial information on which the pro forma information is based is appropriately identified

Pro Forma in Conjunction with Other Services

Can the pro forma engagement be performed in conjunction with a compilation, review or an audit? Yes. Alternatively, the pro forma engagement can be performed separately.

Required Documentation

What documentation is to be retained in the file?

  • Engagement letter
  • The results of procedures performed
  • Copy of the pro forma financial information
  • Copy of the accountant’s compilation report

Compilation Report Required

Is a compilation report to be issued? Yes. (See sample report below.)

Is the accountant offering any assurance regarding the pro forma information? No.

Can the pro forma compilation report be added to the accountant’s report on historical financial statements? Yes. Alternatively, the pro forma compilation report can be presented separately.

Effective Date of SSARS 22

What’s the effective date of SSARS 22? The standard is effective for compilation reports on pro forma financial information dated on or after May 1, 2017.

Potential New Service for Your Clients

If you are not already providing pro forma information to clients, consider suggesting this service when appropriate. Clients may find pro forma information helpful in evaluating the potential sale of stock, the borrowing of funds for a project, or the sale of a part of the business.

Sample SSARS 22 Compilation Report

Exhibit B of SSARS 22 provides the following sample compilation report on pro forma financial information:

Management is responsible for the accompanying pro forma condensed balance sheet of XYZ Company as of December 31, 20X1, and the related pro forma condensed statement of income for the year then ended (pro forma financial information), based on the criteria in Note 1. The historical condensed financial statements are derived from the financial statements of XYZ Company, on which I (we) performed a compilation engagement, and of ABC Company, on which other accountants performed a compilation engagement. The pro forma adjustments are based on management’s assumptions described in Note 1. (We) have performed a compilation engagement in accordance with Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services promulgated by the Accounting and Review Services Committee of the AICPA. I (we) did not examine or review the pro forma financial information nor was (were) I (we) required to perform any procedures to verify the accuracy or completeness of the information provided by management. Accordingly, I (we) do not express an opinion, a conclusion, nor provide any form of assurance on the pro forma financial information.

The objective of this pro forma financial information is to show what the significant effects on the historical financial information might have been had the underlying transaction (or event) occurred at an earlier date. However, the pro forma condensed financial statements are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations or related effects on financial position that would have been attained had the above mentioned transaction (or event) actually occurred at such earlier date.

[Additional paragraph(s) may be added to emphasize certain matters relating to the compilation engagement or the subject matter.]

[Signature of accounting firm or accountant, as appropriate] [Accountant’s city and state]
[Date of the accountant’s report]

Financial Statement Disclosures
Aug 31

How to Write Clear Financial Statement Disclosures

By Charles Hall | Accounting and Auditing

Creating clear financial statement disclosures is not always easy. Creating (unintentional) confusion? Well, that’s another matter.

Financial Statement Disclosures

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Clear Financial Statement Disclosures

Let’s pretend that Olympic (CPA) judges rate your most recent note disclosures, flashing scores to a worldwide audience. What do you see? Tens everywhere—or something much less?

Balance sheets tend to be clear. Why? The accounting equation. Assets always equal liabilities plus equity. But there is no disclosure equation (darn it) and without such, we flounder. 

Since we tend to be linear thinkers, we enjoy Pascal more than Hemingway, numbers more than words, debits and credits more than paragraphs. Accountants’ brains are wired that way—at least that’s my excuse.

I recall—in 1983—English teachers coming to my University of Georgia accounting classes. At the time, I thought, “What a waste!” Now decades later, I see the wisdom. Accounting is more than just numbers. It is a communication made up of financial statements and narratives. So, in the name of clearer disclosures, I offer these suggestions.

Consider Your Readers

Who will read the financial statements? Owners, lenders, and possibly vendors. Owners—especially those of smaller businesses—may need simpler language. Some CPAs write notes as if CPAs (alone) will read the financial statements. While accounting is technical, we need—as much as possible—to simplify.  

Use Short Paragraphs

Some lengthy paragraphs choke the reader and cause confusion. Breaking long paragraphs into shorter ones makes the print more accessible. And the shortening of paragraphs transforms overwhelming mouthfuls into bite-sized morsels. 

Then say what needs to be said, and get out of there. Less is more in many instances. When we try to say too much, we sometimes say…too much. Additionally, short sentences are helpful.   

Use Short Sentences

I’m not sure, but CPAs may have invented the run-on sentence. As I read one of those beauties, I feel as though I can’t breathe. And by the end, I’m gasping. Breaking long sentences into shorter ones makes your reader more comfortable. And she will thank you. And while we are addressing more succinct language, how about using more concise words?

Use Shorter Words

CPAs don’t receive merit badges for long, complicated words. Our goal is to communicate, not to impress. For example, split is better than bifurcate.  

And attorneys are not our model. I sometimes see notes that are simply regurgitations of legal agreements, copied word for word—and you can feel the stiltedness. Do your reader a favor and translate the legalese into digestible—and might I say, more enjoyable—language. 

Use Tables

Long sentences with several numbers can be confusing. Readers comprehend tables more quickly than jumbled narratives.

Write Your Own Note

Too many CPAs copy note examples from the Internet without understanding whether the language fits the financial statements they are creating. Make sure the language is appropriate for your company.

Put Disclosures in the Right Buckets (or Reference)

Think of each disclosure header as a bucket. For example, if the notes include a related party disclosure, then that’s where the related party information goes. If the debt note includes a related party disclosure (and this may be necessary), then make reference–in the related party disclosure–to the debt note. You don’t want your reader to think all of the related party disclosures are in one place (the related party note) when one is somewhere else (the debt note). The same issue arises in subsequent event notes.

Have a Second Person Review the Notes

When writing, we sometimes think we are clear when we are not. Have a second person review the note for proper punctuation, spelling, structure and clarity. If you don’t have a second person available to review the notes, perform a cold review the next day—you will almost always see necessary revisions. I find that reading out loud helps me assess my writing’s clarity.

I also use Grammarly to edit documents. The software provides grammar feedback as you write. If you don’t have a second person to review your financials, I highly recommend this product.

Use a Current Disclosure Checklist

Vetting your notes with a disclosure checklist may be the most tedious and necessary step. FASB and GASB continue to issue new statements at a rapid rate, so using a checklist is needed to ensure completeness.   

Winning Gold

I hope these suggestions help you win gold–10s everywhere. May you hear your national anthem and glow in the success of clear communication.

By the way, FASB recently issued exposure drafts related to the materiality of disclosures. We need guidance that helps us assess when disclosures are necessary—and when they are not. So hopefully, in the not-to-distant future, we’ll have standards that assist in determining when disclosures are needed.

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