Category Archives for "Technology"

four steps to delightful presentations
Dec 03

Four Steps to Delightful Accounting Presentations

By Charles Hall | Technology

In this article, I provide you with four steps to delightful accounting presentations–even if you are a CPA. Yes, this can be done!

four steps to delightful accounting presentations

If you’ve read the book Presentation Zen, you know that many speakers–without intending to–hide their message. In watching CPE presentations and board presentations, I have noticed that (we) CPAs unwittingly hide our message. How? We present slide decks that look like intermediate accounting textbooks–chock full of facts, but too much to digest. And do we really believe that those attending will take those slides back to the office and study them?

Probably not.

My experience has been those slides end up in the office dungeon, never to be seen again. We have one chance to communicate–in the session.

Four Steps to Delightful Accounting Presentations

It is the presenter’s duty to cause learningSo how can we  engage our audience (even those sitting on the back row playing with their cell phones)? Let’s start with the slide deck.

1. Make Simple Slides

Make simple slides.

I try to have no more than two points per slide, and I leave out references to professional standards (at least on the slides).

What happens when you see a slide that looks like it contains the whole of War and Peace? If you’re like me, you may think, “Are you kidding? You want me to consume all of that in the next three minutes. Forget it. I will not even try.” And then you begin to think about your golf game or your next vacation. So, how much information should you include on a slide?

Nancy Duarte recommends the glance test for each slide. “People should be able to comprehend it in three seconds.”

2. Include a picture related to the topic

Include a picture.

For example, if I am presenting to auditors, I might display a picture of someone being bribed. Verbal information is remembered about ten percent of the time. If a picture is included, the figure goes up to sixty-five percent. Quite a difference.

power of pictures

3. Tell a story (and ask questions)

Tell a story and ask questions.

People love stories. If your presentation is about bribes and you have not audited a bribery situation, Google bribes, and you will find all the stories you need. If you can’t find a story, use a hypothetical. Why? You are trying to draw your audience in–then maybe they will put that cell phone down (your most triumphant moment as a speaker!).

Telling your story at the right pace and volume are also important.

Also engage your audience with questions. Stories get the juices going; questions make them dig. And, if they answer you, there is dialog. And what’s the result? Those talking learn, the audience learns, and, yes, you learn.

4. Move

Move. Not too much, but at least some.

A statue is not the desired effect. Moving like Michael Jackson is also not what you desire (moonwalking was never in my repertoire anyway). But movement, yes. I walk slowly from side to side (without moonwalking) and will, at times, move toward the audience when I want to make a point. So, am I constantly roaming? No. Balance is important.

Now, let me provide a few thoughts about presentation software and handouts.

Presentation Software and Handouts

Presentation Software

If you have an Apple computer, let me recommend Keynote as your presentation software. I do think PowerPoint (for you Windows users) has improved, but personally, I prefer Keynote.

Handouts

If you need to provide detailed information, give your participants handouts. I sometimes provide narrative summaries in addition to the slide deck. Then, if you like, refer your audience to the supporting material.

Your Presentation Tips

What do you do to make your presentations sizzle?

CPA's Computer Desktop
Oct 10

What’s on a CPA’s Computer Desktop?

By Charles Hall | Technology

I’m always curious about what another golfer has in his or her bag. 60-degree wedge? Belly Putter? Callaway driver? You can tell a lot about a golfer by what he carries.

The same is true with, “what’s on a CPA’s computer desktop?” Our desktops say a great deal about how we think and get things done.

So, in the interest of sharing, here are some things on my desktop. Hopefully, you’ll see some ideas that you can use. 

CPA's Computer Desktop

 

CPA’s Computer Desktop

1. Checkpoint Tools for PPC.

With one click I can see all of the practice aids I’ve subscribed to, things like:

  • Engagement letters
  • Audit programs
  • Risk assessment forms
  • Letters to those charged with governance

I also have access to PPC’s Interactive Disclosure Libraries. I use this to find sample note disclosures.

2. The peer review general audit engagement checklist.

With one click, I can see what the AICPA peer review checklist says about work papers. (There are many more peer review checklists, but this one provides a generic quick look.)

3. The most recent PPC disclosure checklist.

The checklist provides me with quick answers to disclosure questions.

4. TValue Link.

Need a loan amortization? It’s one click away.

5. Scansnap Organizer Link.

I keep a Fujitsu iX500 ScanSnap scanner on the corner of my desk. When paper arrives, I scan it and file it.

6. Link to Excel (in Windows toolbar).

One click to spreadsheets.

7. Link to Word (in Windows toolbar).

One click to documents.

8. Snipping Tool (accessed with Windows Start button)

I use the Windows snipping tool to capture anything on my screen quickly.

9. Link to Adobe Acrobat (in Windows toolbar).

How can one live without Adobe Acrobat? Scan and annotate your documents.

10. Link to Judy’s Tenkey (in Windows toolbar).

One click to my electronic adding machine.

11. Link to Evernote (in Windows toolbar).

One click to my personal digital library.

12. Link to Firefox (in Windows toolbar).

Yes, I’m a Firefox fan (I like it better than Explorer).

13. ShareFile icon (in Windows toolbar).

One click to secure file sharing.

14. Zoom icon (in Windows toolbar).

One click to conferencing software.

Finally, let me recommend Fences (by Stardock) for Windows-based systems. It allows you to group your desktop icons into one area of your screen (e.g., Research). 

That’s what’s on my desktop. What about yours?

iPhone Evernote app
Sep 05

How CPAs Can Use the Evernote App on Their iPhones

By Charles Hall | Technology

How can CPAs use the Evernote app on their iPhones? Evernote is one of the most valuable tools that an accountant or CPA can use. You just have to know what it can do and how to use it–and it’s not that hard (I promise).

Here’s an Evernote short-course. See the four videos below for demonstrations of how the iPhone Evernote app will work for you.

Using iPhone Evernote app

1. An Evernote Overview

This video provides an overview of the Evernote app on an iPhone. You’ll see how easy it is to create and search notes.

For more information, see my post Evernote for CPAs. This post provides a printable summary of how you can create and use notes.

2. How to Add a New Note

This video shows you how to add a new note to your Evernote library.

3. How to Add Audio and Photograph File to Evernote

This video demonstrates how to add audio files or photographs to your Evernote library. You can start a new file in seconds. Click here to see how.

For additional tips regarding how to add new notes, see Seven Ways to Feed Evernote.

4. Using the Search Bar

After you’ve used Evernote for a while, you may have several hundred files. Then you may find it more challenging to find the needle in the haystack. But Evernote provides a powerful search bar that enables you to find what you need.

Here are additional Tips on Searching Your Evernote Account.

You can download your Evernote iPhone app here

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