Yellow Book CPE Requirements – A Summary

By Charles Hall | Accounting and Auditing

Sep 11

What are the requirements for Yellow Book continuing professional education (CPE)?

Below we will address (1) who is subject to the Yellow Book CPE requirements and (2) what CPE classes satisfy those requirements.

Yellow Book CPEOverview

First realize there are two rules:

  1. The 80-hour rule (every two years)
  2. The 24-hour rule (every two years)

Then you must answer:

  1. Who is subject to each rule?
  2. What classes qualify for each rule?

The 24 Hour Rule – Who is Subject?

The answer: each auditor performing work on a Yellow Book audit; if as an auditor you work on the engagement, you are subject to this rule. If your audit report contains a Yellow Book report (usually located just after the notes to the financial statements), then that engagement is subject to generally accepted government auditing standards (GAGAS).

The 80-Hour Rule – Who is Subject?

The answer: Auditors who are involved in any amount of:

1. Planning,
2. Directing, or
3. Reporting on GAGAS assignments
and
4. Those auditors who are not involved in those activities but charge 20 percent or more of their time annually to GAGAS assignments.

I interpret 1., 2. and 3. as mainly partners, managers, and in-charges. 4. relates to staff who support the audit.

So a staff person that does not meet the criteria in 4., but still works on a Yellow Book engagement must still satisfy the 24-hour rule (but not the 80-hour rule).

What Classes Qualify?

The Yellow Book states, “Determining what subjects are appropriate for individual auditors to satisfy both the 80-hour and the 24-hour requirements is a matter of professional judgment to be exercised by auditors in consultation with appropriate officials in their audit organizations.”

First we see that there is judgment in what qualifies (no bright yellow lines). But there are differences in the 80-hour rule and the 24-hour rule; otherwise, there would be only one category.

The 80-Hour Rule – Classes that Qualify

The 80-hour rule is broad (encompassing any CPE that enhances the auditor’s professional proficiency); so, for example, CPE classes about writing skills or using Excel would qualify. (Taxation CPE usually does not qualify unless the class addresses audit-related issues. For example, a 1040 tax class does not qualify.)

For those subject to the 80 hour rule, at least 20 hours of CPE should be taken in each year of the two-year period; a total of 80 hours is to be taken in the two-year period.

The 24-Hour Rule – Classes that Qualify

Each auditor performing work under GAGAS should complete, every 2 years, at least 24 hours of CPE that directly relates to government auditing, the government environment, or the specific or unique environment in which the audited entity operates.

The 24-hour rule is specific to:
(1) Government auditing,
(2) The government environment or
(3) To the specific or unique environment in which the audited entity operates.

Government Auditing

Classes directly related to standards used in governmental auditing qualify; since GAGAS incorporates the AICPA statements on auditing standards (SASs) for field work and reporting, then audit classes that include a study of the SASs as they relate to the audit of your governmental entity would qualify. The same is true of pronouncements issued by the FASB. Single Audit classes also obviously qualify.

Government Environment

CPE dealing with Governmental Accounting Standards (GASB pronouncements) will qualify for the 24-hour rule since the class focuses on accounting standards in the government environment.

If you audit a county or a city, then most any CPE dealing with GASB pronouncements or governmental issues (e.g., sales taxes) will satisfy the 24-hour rule; also classes dealing with compliance with laws and regulations qualify.

Classes addressing economic conditions, fiscal trends, and pressures facing the governmental entity qualify.

Specific or Unique Environment in Which the Audited Entity Operates

Suppose you audit electric membership corporations (EMCs) subject to the Yellow Book; a CPE class about electrical supply grids qualifies. Or if you audit banks subject to Yellow Book requirements (e.g., FHA loans), then a CPE class dealing with lending qualifies. These classes address issues in the unique environment in which the audited entity operates.

Two-Year Cycle

An audit organization can adopt a standard 2-year period for all of its auditors to simplify administration of the CPE requirements.

Carryover Credit

Auditors are not allowed to carry over hours taken in excess of the 24-hour or 80-hour rule to the next reporting period.

Proration of Hours for New-Hires (or Those Newly Assigned to a Yellow Book Audit)

You will prorate the hourly requirements based on the remaining 6-month intervals in your two-year reporting period. For example, you hire someone on May 1, 2013 and your two-year cycle ends December 31, 2013. There is only one remaining 6-month period. If you are subject to the 24 hour rule, then you will multiply 25% (one six-month period divided by the four six-month periods in the two-year cycle) times 24 to compute the hours required: 6 hours.

GAO Guidance

Click here for the April 2005 GAO publication: Government Auditing Standards, Guidance on GAGAS Requirements for Continuing Professional Education.

Learn from my CPA Hall Talk newsletter!

Get my free weekly accounting and auditing digest with the latest content.

Powered by ConvertKit
Follow

About the Author

Charles Hall is a practicing CPA and Certified Fraud Examiner. For the last thirty years, he has primarily audited governments, nonprofits, and small businesses. He is the author of The Little Book of Local Government Fraud Prevention and Preparation of Financial Statements & Compilation Engagements. He frequently speaks at continuing education events. Charles is the quality control partner for McNair, McLemore, Middlebrooks & Co. where he provides daily audit and accounting assistance to over 65 CPAs. In addition, he consults with other CPA firms, assisting them with auditing and accounting issues.

Leave a Comment:

(6) comments

Charles Hall September 12, 2013

Thanks Armando. I did this particular post because I seem to spend so much time answering questions about it (and I still, at times, struggle with what classes are acceptable).

Reply
armando balbin September 12, 2013

Well explained. Thank you Charles.

Reply
Erin Sacco Pineda September 20, 2013

Thank you for the explanation; especially the last paragraph about proration and the 2-year reporting period. That’s where I have gotten hung up before. On that note, do you know if there is a specified lag time for meeting the requirement. That is, if the new staff hired in May doesn’t get those CE hours until November, but has been working on YB audits since they started, are you still in compliance?

Reply
Charles Hall September 20, 2013

Erin, I am of the opinion that a new staff person only needs to meet the prorated requirement by the end of the two-year cycle. In other words, I am not aware of any requirement to get the CPE before being assigned to the engagement – although I’m sure this (getting the CPE before being assigned) would be preferable from GAO’s point of view.

Reply

[…] Yellow Book CPE Requirements – A recap of the special CPE rules. Condensed: You need 80 hours of classes enhancing your professional proficiency and 24 hour related to the specialized areas of your clients. Hyper-condensed:  80 hours A&A, 24 hours A-133. […]

Reply
Armando Balbin December 20, 2014

For me the hours have not been a problem. Given the demanding need to keep abreast of governmental technical issues, it is difficult not to have in excess than 100 hours every two years. Thanks Charles for the good information

Reply
Add Your Reply

Leave a Comment:

>