Category Archives for "Preparation, Compilation & Review"

Going Concern
Aug 02

Going Concern in Compilation and Review Engagements

By Charles Hall | Preparation, Compilation & Review

Do you need to concern yourself with going concern in compilation and review engagements? Yes, if the financial statements are prepared in accordance with the FASB Codification. But is going concern relevant to special purpose frameworks such as the cash basis or tax basis financial statements. Yes, going concern is in play even with special purpose frameworks. This post provides an overview of what you need to know about going concern as it relates to compilation and review engagements.

I recently wrote a post about ASU 2014-15, Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern, which is effective for years ending after December 15, 2016. This standard requires companies to include certain disclosures when substantial doubt is present. So, we know that financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP must include these disclosures. Otherwise, there is a GAAP departure. And in an audit, we modify our opinion when there is a departure.

Going Concern

Going Concern in Compilation Engagements

But what about financial statements subject to a compilation engagement, especially when substantially all disclosures are omitted? Is it not permissible for the CPA to ignore the going concern standard since it just requires disclosures? Yes, but be careful. Ask yourself whether the financial statements would be misleading (without the going concern disclosure). If they are misleading, then include a selected disclosure regarding going concern. Also, consider adding an emphasis of matter paragraph (regarding going concern) to your compilation report.

Consider the alternative. Your client (who has significant going concern issues) takes your compilation report and their financial statements (that has no disclosures) to a local bank. It’s obvious that the company is in poor shape. But the bank makes a large loan anyway, and later, the company defaults. Then the bank files suit against you (the CPA) asserting that you issued the compilation report without the emphasis of matter and financial statements without the going concern disclosure–knowing the statements were misleading.

Sample Compilation Report with a Going Concern Paragraph

An emphasis of a matter paragraph (concerning the going concern issue) is not required but may be necessary to ensure clarity. Below is a sample compilation report–with a going concern emphasis of matter–from the AICPA’s Preparation, Compilation and Review Audit Guide.

Management is responsible for the accompanying financial statements of XYZ Company, which comprise the balance sheets as of December 31, 20X2 and 20X1 and the related statements of income, changes in stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes to the financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. I (We) have performed compilation engagements in accordance with Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services promulgated by the Accounting and Review Services Committee of the AICPA. I (We) did not audit or review the financial statements nor was (were) I (we) required to perform any procedures to verify the accuracy or completeness of the information provided by management. Accordingly, I (we) do not express an opinion, a conclusion, nor provide any form of assurance on these financial statements.

As discussed in Note X, certain conditions indicate that the Company may be unable to continue as a going concern. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

[Signature of accounting firm or accountant, as appropriate]
[Accountant’s city and state]
[Date of the accountant’s report]

Going Concern in Review Engagements

Since review engagements require full disclosure, going concern disclosures–when substantial doubt exists in GAAP financial statements–are not optional. They must be provided. If not, then a GAAP departure exists.

AR-C 90.65 states “The accountant should consider whether, during the performance of review procedures, evidence or information came to the accountant’s attention indicating that there could be an uncertainty about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern for a reasonable period of time.” So what’s a reasonable period of time? GAAP specifies the period as one year after the date the financial statements are available to be issued. If a financial reporting framework does not specify a period (such as the cash basis of accounting), then use one year from the date of the financial statements being reviewed.

The Accounting and Review Services Committee (ARSC) is presently reviewing AR-C 90 in light of FASB’s going concern standard, ASU 2014-15. ARSC is working to align the review standards with FASB’s going concern standards. Also, expect to see a requirement that an emphasis of matter paragraph be added to the review report when substantial doubt is present. 

Sample Going Concern Paragraph in a Review Report

Here’s a sample emphasis of matter paragraph for a review report.

Emphasis of Matter

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note X to the financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring losses from operations and has a net capital deficiency that raises an uncertainty about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note X. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty. Our conclusion is not modified with respect to this matter.

Special Purpose Frameworks

While the cash, modified cash, or tax bases of accounting do not address going concern, accountants still need to consider the effects of negative financial conditions and trends. Why? When using a special purpose framework (like the tax basis), the accountant should follow the guidance in GAAP. No, that doesn’t mean your disclosures are just like GAAP, but it does mean they are similar to GAAP.

Since GAAP tells the financial statement preparer to consider whether substantial doubt exists, then persons creating cash basis, modified cash basis or tax basis financial statements should do the same. If substantial doubt is present, going concern disclosures are necessary. Follow FASB’s guidance in my going concern post to create your special purpose framework disclosures.

So, what is substantial doubt? The FASB Codification defines it this way:

Substantial doubt about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern is considered to exist when aggregate conditions and events indicate that it is probable that the entity will be unable to meet obligations when due within one year of the date that the financial statements are issued or are available to be issued.

If substantial doubt is present and going concern disclosures are not included in full disclosure compilations or reviews, then modify your accountant’s report (for the departure). 

Printing Financial Statements From QuickBooks
May 30

SSARS 21 and Printing Financial Statements from Quickbooks

By Charles Hall | Preparation, Compilation & Review

Many CPAs are still asking if printing financial statements from Quickbooks triggers a requirement to follow SSARS 21. Previously, if a CPA created and submitted financial statements to a client, he had to issue a compilation report. Hear the answer in this video. 

Also, we’ll take a look at whether you as a CPA can issue monthly financial statements in accordance with SSARS 21 and then perform an audit for the same client at the end of the year. 

Note: This video was created in 2015, but the information is still current. SSARS 23 does not alter the answers.

SSARS 23 changes preparation and compilation standards
May 17

SSARS 23 Changes Preparation and Compilation Engagements

By Charles Hall | Preparation, Compilation & Review

SSARS 23 changes preparation and compilation engagements. The article summarizes the effects of the new standard.

The Accounting and Review Services Committee (ARSC) issued SSARS 23 in October 2016. Parts of the standard (e.g., that applying to supplementary information language in compilation and review reports) were effective immediately. Other parts (mainly regarding preparation and compilation of prospective information) are required as of May 1, 2017. This post tells you how SSARS 23 affects Preparation (AR-C 70) and Compilation (AR-C 80) engagements.

SSARS 23 changes preparation and compilation engagements

You’ll recall that ARSC issued SSARS 21 back in October 2014. It was effective for years ending December 31, 2015. A clarified version of the compilation and review standards is included in SSARS 21. SSARS 21 also provides new guidance for the preparation of financial statements. The Standard did not address prospective financial statements. Why? The AICPA was working on clarifying the Attestation Standards (SSAE 18), the place where compiled prospective financial statement guidance was (previously) housed. With the issuance of SSARS 23, the AICPA moved this guidance from the Attestation Standards to SSARS.

The primary impact of SSARS 23 is to provide standards for the preparation and compilation of prospective financial information.

How Preparation of Financial Statements (AR-C 70) Changed

The Preparation Standard (AR-C 70) now includes guidance regarding prospective financial information. SSARS 23 requires the inclusion of significant assumptions since they are essential to understanding prospective information. Therefore, accountants should not prepare prospective financial information without including a summary of significant assumptions in the notes. Also, a financial projection should not be created unless it includes:

  • an identification of the hypothetical assumptions, or 
  • a description of the limitations on the usefulness of the presentation

One other change to AR-C 70 is the slight change to the preparation disclaimer. SSARS 23 deletes the word “accordingly.” See below:

How Compilation Engagements (AR-C 80) Changed

AR-C 80, Compilation Engagements, now applies to compilations of prospective financial information (new with SSARS 23), pro forma financial information (see SSARS 22), and other historical information (as provided for in SSARS 21). 

Another change is that accountants should report known departures from the applicable financial reporting framework in the compilation report. Prior to SSARS 23, accountants could disclose such departures in the notes without doing so in the compilation report.

Prospective Financial Information Guidance

Additionally, AR-C 70 and AR-C 80 were amended to clarify that the AICPA Guide Prospective Financial Information provides comprehensive guidance regarding prospective financial information, including suitable criteria for the preparation and presentation of such information.

Short SSARS 23 Video

If you desire additional information about SSARS 23, check out my video:

 

Lacking Independence
May 16

Compilations: Lacking Independence in the Current or Prior Period

By Charles Hall | Preparation, Compilation & Review

Do you lack independence in a compilation engagement? If yes, then here’s how to disclose the impairment in the compilation report.

An accountant can issue a compilation report even though independence is lacking. When independence is impaired, SSARS 21 requires that the CPA modify the compilation report. The cause of the impairment (e.g., you own a portion of the business) can be disclosed in the compilation report but is not required. You can–if you prefer–simply say you are not independent; this is what most CPAs do.

Lacking Independence

Lacking Independence in Current Year

The accountant’s compilation report can disclose a lack of independence as follows:

We are not independent with respect to ABC Company.

Just add this sentence separately at the bottom of the compilation report.

Lacking Independence in the Prior Year

If you were not independent in 2016 but you are independent in 2017 (and comparative statements are presented), the accountant’s report can read:

As of and for the year ended December 31, 2016, we were not independent with respect to ABC Company.

Alternatively, the report can read:

As of and for the year ended December 31, 2016, we were not independent with respect to ABC Company. We are currently independent with respect to ABC Company.

Independence in Review Engagements and Audits

CPAs must be independent to perform review engagements or audits. There are no exceptions. See the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct for guidance on independence issues. Independence rules are found in section 1.200.

Independence in Preparation of Financial Statement Engagements

CPAs can perform a Preparation of Financial Statement engagement without being independent. No independence disclosure is required since this service is a nonattest engagement. 

 

financial statement references
May 10

Financial Statement References (at the Bottom of the Page)

By Charles Hall | Accounting and Auditing , Preparation, Compilation & Review

What wording is required at the bottom of financial statement pages? Is there a difference in the references in audited statements and those in compilations or reviews? What wording should be placed at the bottom of supplementary pages? Below I’ll answer these questions.

financial statement references

Picture is courtesy of Dollarphotoclub.com

Audited Financial Statements and Supplementary Information

First, let’s look at financial statement references in audit reports.

While generally accepted accounting principles do not require financial page references to the notes, it is a common practice to do so. Here are examples:

  • See notes to the financial statements.
  • The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
  • See accompanying notes.

Accountants can also–though not required–reference specific disclosures on a financial statement page. For example, See Note 6 (next to the Inventory line on a balance sheet). It is my preference to use general references such as See accompanying notes.

Audit standards do not require financial statement page references to the audit opinion.

Supplementary pages attached to audited financial statements should not include a reference to the notes or the opinion.

Preparation, Compilation, and Review Engagements

Now, let’s discuss references in preparation, compilation, and review engagements. 

Compilation and Review Engagements

SSARS 21 does not require a reference (on financial statement pages) to the compilation or review report; however, it is permissible to do so. What do I do? I do not refer to the accountant’s report. I just put See accompanying notes at the bottom of each financial statement page.

You are not required to include a reference to the accountant’s report on the supplementary information pages. SSARS 21 does suggest that such references be included in case the financial statements or supplementary information are separated from the compilation or review report. Examples include:

  • See Accountant’s Compilation Report.
  • See Independent Accountant’s Review Report.

What do I do? I include a reference to the accountant’s report on each supplementary page.

Preparation of Financial Statement Engagements

SSARS 21 provides an option (to compilations) called the preparation of financial statements (AR-C 70), a nonattest service. AR-C 70 requires that the accountant either state on each page that “no assurance is provided” or provide a disclaimer which precedes the financial statements. AR-C 70 does not require that the financial statement pages refer to the disclaimer (if provided), but it is permissible to do so. Such a reference can read See Accountant’s Disclaimer.

If your AR-C 70 work product has supplementary information, consider including this same reference (See Accountant’s Disclaimer) on the supplementary pages.

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